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Kansas Geological Survey, Open-file Report 2003-54


High Plains Aquifer Coalition
High Plains Aquifer Strategic Plan
January 2003

Kansas

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
Kansas Geological Survey (KGS)
Priorities include water, petroleum, non-fuel minerals, geologic hazards and environmental issues. Water studies primarily focus on groundwater, stream/aquifer interaction and sustainability of water sources and water-quality issues.
Contact: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/
Kansas Water Office (KWO)
KWO is the water planning, policy, and coordination agency for the State of Kansas. It prepares a state plan of water resources development, management, and conservation, reviews all water laws, and makes recommendations to the Governor and Legislature for new or amendatory legislation. The Office administers the Kansas Water Plan Storage Act, the Kansas Weather Modification Act, and the Water Assurance Act. It also reviews the plans of any state or local agency for the management of the water and related land resources of the state.
Contact: http://www.kwo.org/
Kansas Water Authority (KWA)
The Kansas Water Authority is within and a part of the Kansas Water Office. It is responsible for advising the Governor, the Legislature, and the Director of the Kansas Water Office on water policy issues, for approving the Kansas Water Plan and revisions thereto, for approving water storage sales, federal contracts, administrative regulations, and legislation proposed by the Kansas Water Office.
Contact: http://www.kwo.org/Org_People/KWA.htm
KS Dept. of Ag Division of Water Resources (DWR)
DWR provides sound management of the state's water resources. DWR administers 28 state laws, including the Kansas water appropriation act, and statutes concerning construction of dams, levees and other changes to streams within Kansas. DWR administers the state's four interstate river compacts and coordinates the national flood insurance program in Kansas.
Contact: http://www.accesskansas.org/kda/dwr/index.html
Kansas Dept. of Health and Environment (KDHE)
KDHE's mission is to optimize the promotion and protection of the health of Kansans through efficient and effective public health programs and services and through preservation, protection, and remediation of natural resources of the environment.
Contact: http://www.kdhe.state.ks.us/
Ground Water Management Districts (GMD's)
Ground Water Management Districts, local units of government, provide water-use administration, planning and information. Five ground water management districts were created in the 1970's in the western and central parts of the state. The districts are governed by local boards and have been instrumental in providing information and identifYing research and regulatory needs within their boundaries.
Contact: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Hydro/gmd.html

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Quantity and quality of ground water in HPA
  • HPA subunit protocol development
High Plains Aquifer Evaluation. Provides research and data for use in planning, policy, regulation, and protection of the High Plains aquifer. Integrates hydrogeological, agricultural, economic data as well as other HPA aspects.
Year: Current
Location: (http://www.kgs.ku.edu/HighPlains/index.shtml)
Contact: KGS
  • Ground water declines
KGS/GMD4 Pilot Studies. Define the hydrogeologic variables that can be used to predict the rates of groundwater level declines in the future.
Year: Current
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/HighPlains/GMD4.htm
Contact: KGS
  • Ground water and surface water interaction
  • Safe and sustainable yield
Safe Yield and Sustainable Development of Water Resources in Kansas. Research considers entire water system (hydrologic cycle) in managing water resources, and how ground water and surface water interact.
Year: Current
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/pic9/pic9_1.html (Public Information Circular)
Contact: KGS
  • Ground water nitrate contamination
Nitrate in Kansas Groundwater. Describes nitrate, its sources, the extent of the nitrate problem in Kansas, and how ground water can be protected from nitrate contamination.
Year: Current
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/pic14/pic14_1.html (Public Information Circular)
Contact: KGS
  • Drawdown
  • Stream and aquifer interactions
Stream-Aquifer Interactions. Drawdown and stream depletion produced by pumping in the vicinity of a partially penetrating stream.
Year: Current
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/StreamAq/index.html
Contact: KGS
  • Aquifer site characterization
Aquifer/Site Characterization. Direct-push hydraulic profiling in an unconsolidated alluvial aquifer; Simple Procedures for Analysis of Slug Tests in Formations of High Hydraulic Conductivity using Spreadsheet and Scientific Graphics; The Dipole Flow Test for Site Characterization: Some Practical Considerations; and Hydrostratigraphic Characterization of Unconsolidated Alluvial Deposits with Direct-Push Sensor Technology.
Year: Current
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Hydro/WellTests/index.html;
http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Hydro/DirectPush/index.html
Contact: KGS
  • Ground water and surface water interactions
  • Saturated thickness
  • Storage and availability
  • Recharge
  • Water usage
  • Usable lifetime
  • Sustainability
High Plains Aquifer Evaluation. The atlas focuses on groundwater and related water resource issues in the High Plains aquifer in western and central Kansas.
Year: 2000
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/HighPlains/indexold.html (archived web site)
http://www.kgs.ku.edu/HighPlains/atlas/index.html (An Atlas of the Kansas High Plains Aquifer)
Contact: KGS
  • Salinity
  • River flow and quality
  • Groundwater levels and quality
  • Water use
Upper Arkansas River Corridor Study. Evaluates the fate and transport of the dissolved solids that are contaminating the ground water resources of the HPA in the river corridor. The evaluation includes determining the relationships among river flow and quality, ground-water levels and quality, and water use.
Year: Past 5 years
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Hydro/UARC/index.html
Contact: KGS
  • Salinity
Mineral Intrusion into the Great Bend Prairie Aquifer. Provides basic explanation of how saltwater enters water supplies, and outlines methods that might diminish or prevent natural salt contamination of freshwater aquifers.
Year: Past 5 years
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/pic2/pic2_1.html (Public Information Circular)
Contact: KGS, GMD No. 5
  • Salinity
Equus Beds Aquifer Mineral Intrusion Project. Potential for salt contamination of public water supplies in Eauus Beds Ground Water Management District No. 2.
Year: Past 5 years
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Hydro/Equus/index.html
Contact: KGS, GMD No. 2, US Bur. of Reclamation

 

Additional Hydrologic and Geologic Research in Kansas
Research TopicResearch Summary, Contact
Surface water and ground water interactions
The Geohydrology Section, of the KS Water Plan, recently completed the integration of computer models for surface- and ground-water hydrology; the USDA and Texas A&M University supported the project.
Contact: KGS
Stream and aquifer interactions
Another study was hydraulic characterization of the stream-aquifer interface; the work is being conducted in cooperation with the University of Nebraska and is supported by a competitive USGS grant. A stream-aquifer interaction investigation has been initiated in the middle Arkansas River corridor in cooperation with the Subbasin Water Resources Management Program of the Kansas Department of Agriculture (KDA).
Contact: KGS
Water Resources Sustainability and Aquifer Recharge
The Geohydrology Section, of the KS Water Plan, develops publications that address the issue of water resources sustainability and the safe yield of aquifers. A key consideration in balancing the water budget is knowledge of aquifer recharge. The Section, in a cooperative research project with the USGS and Kansas State University, is quantifying ground water recharge through the deep vadose zone of the High Plains aquifer using state-of-the-art sensors based on physically-based methodologies.
Contact: KGS
Aquifer Site Characterization
The accurate assessment of the threat that ground water contamination site poses to nearby water users depends on the quality of the information obtained through field investigations. The Geohydrology Section, of the KS Water Plan, is developing and refining the field methodologies used in site characterization. These include slug-test, direct-push, and hydraulic tomography technologies for the characterization of preferential flow paths, zones in which a contaminant moves much faster than the average hydraulic conductivity of the water-bearing formation. Another approach is the application of a moving mesh technique for ground-water modeling of contamination plumes. This work is conducted in cooperation with governmental and private entities and other universities and includes support by competitive USGS and NSF grants.
Contact: KGS
Contaminant distribution and fate in ground water
Protection of the quality of Kansas' water resources from contamination by nitrate and other substances is a high priority. The Geohydrology Section, of the KS Water Plan, is determining the sources of nitrate (e.g., agrochemicals, animal and human wastes, soil nitrogen) contaminating ground water using nitrogen isotopes. Recent projects identifYing sources and determining nitrate distribution have been conducted for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), Ground Water Management Districts, and cities. Other studies include development of GIS tools for assessing potential impacts of pesticide use on ground-water quality for the KDA, and determination of the source area of water contributing to the spring discharge used for the water supply of Florence for the KDHE.
Contact: KGS
Salinization of water resources
Multiple sources of salinity degrade the quality of water resources in Kansas, including natural saltwater discharged from bedrock, dissolved solids concentrated by evapotranspiration, and wastewaters such as oil brine and water-softener discharge. The Geohydrology Section, of the KS Water Plan, recently completed a Kansas Water Plan project evaluating the transport of saline Arkansas River water contaminating the ground-water resources of the High Plains aquifer in the river corridor. A salt assessment study was conducted for the TMDL Program of the KDHE. Recent investigations of saltwater source identification have also been carried out for the KDA and Kansas Corporation Commission.
Contact: KGS
Information processing, display, and dissemination systems The transfer of water-related information to users, such as policy and decision makers and the public, is a primary component of KGS work. A vital part of this activity is the effective display, dissemination, and interactive analysis of data in a way that converts the information to a usable form. The KGS has developed data management, GIS, and Internet approaches that not only greatly facilitate the processing and transfer of results from KGS water studies, but also analyze and present data in a more readily usable form from other studies. The database and Internet developments are being integrated into Survey-wide advancements in interactive display and dissemination of information.
Contact: KGS

Data Management

The Data Access and Support Center (DASC) housed within the KGS is the State of Kansas's GIS data repository. DASC is charged with developing, maintaining, and serving the Kansas GeoDatabase, a sizable and growing collection of GIS data layers and applications. With few exceptions, all of the data layers have FGDC compliant metadata files and are stored natively in ESRI data formats.
Location: http://www.kansasgis.org/
Access: Public

The Water Information Storage and Retrieval Database (WIZARD) is the primary state repository for water levels and other information on water wells in Kansas. WIZARD contains all of the annual KGS and Kansas Department of Agriculture's, Division of Water Resources water level measurements.
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Magellan/WaterLevels/index.html
Access: Public

The Water Well Completion Records (WWC5) Database contains information from records submitted by water well drillers to the KDHE.
Location: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Magellan/WaterWell/index.html
Access: Public

HPA Future Research Recommendations

Texas

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG)
The BEG mission is to conduct state of the art research in water, energy, and the environment and disseminate the results. Areas of special expertise include research in hydrocarbon energy resources, water resources, coastal studies, and other areas of applied geoscience research.
Contact: http://www.beg.utexas.edu/
Texas Water Development Board (TWDB)
The TWDB mission is to provide leadership, technical services and financial assistance to support planning, conservation and responsible development of water for the State of Texas. To accomplish its goals of planning for the state's water resources and for providing affordable water and wastewater services, the TWDB provides water planning, data collection and dissemination, financial assistance and technical assistance services to the citizens of Texas.
Contact: http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/home/index.asp
Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (TNRCC)
TNRCC is the lead environmental agency for the state. Its web site focuses on regulations and policy, but its Central Records includes a vast data base (mostly non-digital) of results of environmental enforcement investigations under RCRA, Superfund, Petroleum Storage Tank, and others. These include unique data on the hydrogeology of the High Plains aquifer in Texas.
Contact: http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/
Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPWD)
TPWD seeks to manage and conserve the natural and cultural resources of Texas. Playa lakes on the High Plains are both a source of recharge to the aquifer and a vital habitat for endemic and migratory birds and other species.
Contact: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/
Groundwater Conservation Districts
Panhandle Groundwater Conservation District; North Plains Groundwater Conservation District; High Plains Underground Water Conservation District No. 1; are the three largest groundwater conservation districts regulating the use of the High Plains aquifer in Texas. The districts are the source of much of the data digitized in the TWDB web site.
Contact: http://www.panhandlegroundwater.org/
http://www.hpwd.com/
http://www.npwd.org/

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
No comprehensive studies directly related to the HPA in the past 10 years.
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Projections of ground water conditions
  • Ground water flow
Numerical modeling of the Ogallala aquifer in the northern Texas Panhandle--projections of 2000-to-2050 groundwater conditions. Research is sponsored by the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission as part of the Texas Senate Bill I Regional Water Planning Process. This research includes data sets needed for construction and calibration of a numerical model of groundwater flow. The data is mostly digitized in ArcView. Additional studies of the southern portion of the Ogallala aquifer are in progress by others under the same program. 1999 to 2000.
Year:
Location:
Contact: BEG

 

Other Hydrogeologic Research in Texas
Research TopicResearch Summary; Contact
  • Vadose zone hydrology
  • Recharge
  • Near-surface geophysics
The BEG is conducting studies of other aquifers in Texas and on topics including vadose zone hydrology, recharge, and applications of near-surface geophysics to water resource investigations.
Contact: BEG
  • Recharge
  • Saturation
  • Ground Water models
Geology and geohydrology of the DOE Pantex Plant. This research was sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy. Comprehensive scientific investigation of the local setting of the DOE Pantex Plant conducted in support of RCRA investigations by DOE as part of State of Texas oversight. This research includes geologic and hydrologic data on the High Plains aquifer, recharge processes, unsaturated zone, groundwater models. This data is partly digitized.
Years: 1990 to 1995.
Contact: BEG
  • Confined and unconfined aquifers
Paleohydrology of confined and unconfined aquifers in the U.S. Great Plains. This research was sponsored by U.S. Geological Survey. Research includes composition of more than 50 water samples fom the High Plains aquifer and underlying confined aquifers in Texas, New Mexico, Kansas,Wyoming, and Nebraska. This data is mostly non-digitized.
Years: 1990 to 1993.
Contact: USGS
  • Geographic information system (GIS)
Lubbock County pilot study for development of a hydrogeologic geographic information system (GIS) to support TNRCC implementation of risk-data reduction rules. This research is sponsored by Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission. The pilot study demonstrated a methodology for building a GIS for merging site-specific and hydrogeologic data into a GIS database to facilitate retrieval and analysis. Regional and site-specific hydrogeologic data for Lubbock County, Texas, on the High Plains has been digitized in ArcView. The methodology can be applied to other large data sets of contaminated sites for the Texas High Plains using TNRCC data. The approach might be applicable to other states.
Year: 1997.
Contact: BEG
  • Hydrogeologic and geologic HPA data
The BEG conducted studies of the geology and geohydrology of the Texas Panhandle. This research was sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy. Extensive scientific investigations of the regional setting of the Texas Panhandle were conducted as part of research for siting a civilian high-level nuclear waste repository. Includes geologic and hydrogeologic data on the High Plains or Ogallala aquifer and underlying confined aquifers. Data is mostly non-digitized.
Years: 1977 to 1987.
Contact: BEG

Data Management

The Texas Water Development Board web site includes a comprehensive digital database of water wells, drillers' logs, water-level measurements, analyses of chemical composition, and more. Majority of available data is non-digitized.
Location: http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/home/index.asp
Access: Public

HPA Future Research Recommendations

There are a variety of information needs and applied investigations that are very important to refining our understanding of the High Plains Aquifer and providing better tools and strategies for aquifer management. Because the needs vary locally and over time, the prioritization should be determined in consultation with the water management agencies and stakeholders. Among the topics needing further study, data collection, and enhanced characterization are:

Oklahoma

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS)
The Survey's charter is to investigate the land, water, mineral, and energy resources of Oklahoma and to disseminate the results of these investigations to encourage the wise use of the State's natural resources. The primary geological programs of the OGS are related to field investigations (including mapping and stratigraphic studies), energy-related research (particularly oil and natural gas, coalbed methane, and coal), and public and teacher education. Other programs are concerned with earthquakes and other natural hazards. At the present time, the OGS is engaged in no water-related research or studies.
Contact: http://www.ogs.ou.edu/
Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB)
The mission of the OWRB is to effectively and efficiently manage and protect the water resources of the State and plan for Oklahoma's long-range water needs. The agency's priority is water. Our areas of expertise include monitoring surface water quality, monitoring groundwater quantity, and groundwater hydrology. OWRB is developing the expertise in groundwater quality monitoring and surface water quantity modeling.
Contact: http://www.state.ok.us/-owrb/

 

Other Hydrogeologic Research in Oklahoma
Research TopicResearch Summary; Contact
  • Geologic maps of Ogallala formation
The only recent geologic studies of northwest Oklahoma are a series of geologic maps at a scale of 1:100,000 published by the Oklahoma Geological Survey. These maps, produced as part of the USGS STATEMAP program, show the distribution of surface formations, including the Ogallala Formation, and would form the basis for any future surface geological investigations.
Contact:
  • Hydrology
  • Water use
  • Simulation of flow
Hydrology, water use, and simulation of flow in the High Plains aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma, southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas, northeastern New Mexico, and northwestern Texas. The study was completed by Richard F. Luckey and Mark F. Becker, published in 1999 by the U.S. Geological Survey as Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4104. This report was done in cooperation with the OWRB. This report, plus the studies cited in the Selected References section at the end, probably contains most of our knowledge of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma.
Contact: OWRB
  • NAWQA
There is an on-going study by the USGS under the National Water-Quality Assessment Program and a hydrogeologic investigation of the High Plains aquifer in Roger Mills and Beckham Counties by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.
Contact: NAWQA
  • Pollution
There are other water related studies going on in the State, on site-specific pollution related issues, usually funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. An example is the Tar Creek Superfund site in northeast Oklahoma. There are no general aquifer studies going on in the State other than those in progress by the OWRB. Some studies dealing with surface water and groundwater are carried out by the Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute at Oklahoma State University.
Contact: OGS/OWRB
  • Antlers aquifer
A study of the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma has been proposed by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology as part of a much larger study of the Trinity aquifer, as the Antlers is known in Texas. At present, this study is unfunded. The Oklahoma Geological Survey has offered to assist in this study.
Contact: OGS/OKWRB
  • Ground water and surface water interaction
The OWRB is conducting a two-year study on the groundwater and surface water interaction of the North Fork of the Red River above Altus Reservoir, and we anticipate federal funding to begin a five year study on the groundwater and surface water interaction of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma to begin this winter.
Contact: OWRB

Data Management

Oklahoma does not have a central data repository or delivery or distribution system.

HPA Future Research Recommendations

From the Oklahoma perspective, there are many fundamental aspects of the High Plains aquifer that require increased understanding. Some involve new research; others involve data management and accessibility. The following are some areas of research that should be conducted in Oklahoma:

Nebraska

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
Nebraska Conservation and Survey Division (NCSD)
The NCSD mission is to investigate and record information about Nebraska's geologic history, its rock and mineral resources, the quantity and quality of its water resources, land cover and other aspects of its geography, as well as the nature, distribution and uses of its soils.
Contact: http://csd.unl.edu/
Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
The Department of Natural Resources is the result of a merger between the Natural Resources Commission and the Department of Water Resources. The Department is responsible for the oversight of water Quality and Quantity.
Contact: http://www.dnr.state.ne.us/
Nebraska Association of Natural Resource Districts (NARD's)
The Nebraska Association of Resources Districts is the statewide association created by the state's Natural Resources Districts to provide administrative services, legislative representation, and statewide communication and coordination tothe 23 independent districts.
Contact: http://www.nrdnet.org/
Nebraska Natural Resource Districts (NRD's)
Nebraska's system of local natural resources management is unique in the United States. Unlike the county-wide districts found in most states, Nebraska's Natural Resources Districts are based on river basin boundaries, enabling them to approach natural resources management on a watershed basis. There are 23 NRDs in Nebraska. Each district is autonomous, governed by a locally-elected Board of Directors. While NRDs share a common set of responsibilities, each district sets its own priorities and develops its own programs to best serve local needs.
Contact: http://www.nrdnet.org/nrd_guide.htm
Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ)
NDEQ was created pursuant to passage of the Nebraska Environmental Protection Act in 1971. Although the Department has grown and been given additional responsibilities over the years, its ongoing mission has remained the same--the protection of Nebraska's air, soil and water resources.
Contact: http://www.deq.state.ne.us/
Nebraska Health and Human Services System
Manages Nebraska's Water Well Standards and Contractor's Licensing Program and the Public Water Supply Program.
Contact: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us/index.htm

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Ground water and surface water interaction
  • Saturated thickness
  • Contamination
  • Quantity
  • Quality
  • Water usage
The Nebraska Groundwater Atlas. Focuses on ground water and related water resources issues in the HPA in Nebraska.
Year: 1998
Location: http://csd.unl.edu/csd.htm
Contact: NCSD
  • Stream/aquifer interaction
  • Recharge sources
  • Geological mapping
  • Ground water quality
The NCSD through a comprehensive effort has focused research efforts on stream/aquifer relationships, stable isotope evaluations to determine the source of recharge water, geological mapping of various formations which serve as local and regional aquifers and the development of a statewide groundwater .quality data base for all geologic units.
Year: Ongoing
Location: http://csd.unl.edu/
Contact: NCSD
  • Ground water contamination
  • Livestock waste
Holt County Groundwater Education Project, Final Report. Working with four cooperators regarding fertilizer and irrigation best management practices and their effects on reducing ground water contamination due to nitrate-nitrogen. Agricultural Management Practices and the Ground Water System of Northern Holt County, NE. With a focus on the Holt County Groundwater Education Project. Final report due Jan. 2003.
Year: 2003
Location: Upper Elkhorn NRD; Conservation and Survey Division, Education Circular 15; and Cooperative Extension Division, Extension Circular EC02-799-X.
Contact: Upper Elkhorn NRD

 

Other Hydrogeologic Research in Nebraska
Research TopicResearch Summary; Contact
  • Water quality
Upper Elkhorn NRD Ground Water Quality Management Program. Water quality data for the Upper Elkhorn NRD has been collected since the earlv 1970's. Data includes results for basic water quality parameters such as nitrate-nitrogen and pesticides.
Years: 1970's - current
Contact: Upper Elkhorn NRD
  • Water quantity
Upper Elkhorn NRD Ground Water Quantity Management Program. Water quantity data for the Upper Elkhorn NRD has been collected since the early 1970's. Data includes results for Spring and Fall static water levels.
Years: 1970's - current
Contact: Upper Elkhorn NRD or USGS in Lincoln
  • Nonpoint source contamination
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in the Eastern Portion of the Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District: A Special Protection Area Report. 1990.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in the Eastern Part of the Little Blue Natural Resources District: A Special Protection Area Report. 1995.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in Deuel County, NE: A Special Protection Area Report. 1993.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in the Eastern Portion of the Lower Loup Natural Resources District, NE: A Ground Water Management Report. 1995.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in Southern Nuckolls County, NE: A Special Protection Area Report. 1989.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination Northwest of Beatrice, NE: A Special Protection Area Report. 1989.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination Southern Dodge County, NE: A Special Protection Area Report. 1989.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in the Western Portion of the Upper Big Blue Natural Resources District: A Special Protection Area Report. 1992.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in the Northern Portion of the Middle Republican Natural Resources District, NE: A Special Protection Area Report. 1996.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in Eastern Cheyenne County: A Ground Water Management Area Report. 1997.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in the Lower Republican Natural Resources District, NE: A Ground Water Management Area Report. 1998.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Quality in Box Butte County and Mirage Flats, NE: A Ground Water Management Area Report. 1999.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Quality in Eastern Sheridan County, NE: A Ground Water Management Area Report. 2002.
A Study of Nonpoint Source Ground Water Contamination in Red Willow and Hitchcock Counties, NE: A Special Protection Area Report. 1991.

Contact: DEQ
  • Ground water quality
A Study of Ground Water quality in the southern portion of the lower Elkhorn Natural Resource District: A Ground Water Management Area Report.
Year: 2000
Contact: DEQ

Data Management

The Natural Resources Data Bank, statutorily created in 1969, is administered by the DNR. The purpose of the Data Bank is to develop, store, process and manage natural resources data relating to land and water resources of the State, and make the information available to government agencies and the general public in a user-friendly and timely manner. Location: http://www.dnr.state.ne.us/databank/dbindex.html
Access: Public

Several less comprehensive, but more detailed systems are maintained by other state, local and federal agencies and by departments at the University. Examples of specific data sets include observation well water level elevations, records of raw water chemical analysis, water pumping and consumption records and meteorological data from statewide weather stations. Federal metadata standards are not followed by each of the entities who maintain automated data sets. Location: http://csd.unl.edu/csd/genlinfo/datasets.html
Access: Public

HPA Future Research Recommendations

Wyoming

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
Wyoming State Geologist
The Wyoming State Geological Survey is a Separate Operating Agency working under the Executive Branch of State Government (W.S. 9-2-801, 9-2-803 through 9-2-810). The Geological Survey's purposes are (1) to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; (2) to prepare, publish, and distribute (free or for sale) reports and maps of the State's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and (3) to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. The agency's stated mission is to promote the beneficial and environmentally sound use of Wyoming's vast geologic, mineral, and energy resources while helping protect the public from geologic hazards. By providing accurate information and expanding knowledge through the application of geologic principles, the Geological Survey contributes to economic growth and improvement in the quality of life for Wyoming's citizens.
Contact: http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/
Wyoming State Engineer
The Wyoming Constitution defines that all natural waters within the boundaries of the state are declared to be the property of the state. The Wyoming State Engineer's Office is charged with the regulation and administration of the water resources in Wyoming.
Contact: http://seo.state.wy.us/
Wyoming Water Development Commission
The Wyoming Water Development Program was established in 1975 to promote the optimal development of the state's human, industrial, mineral, agricultural, water and recreational resources. In 1979 the Wyoming Water Development Commission (WWOC) was established to implement the water development program and to conduct water and related resource planning.

The Commission is composed of 10 members appointed by the Governor to represent the four state water divisions and the reservation. The Wyoming Water Development Office (WWOO) provides the support for the Commission and is staffed by 18 professional and support employees. The Wyoming Water Development Program receives funding from two sources. Water Development Account I receives the revenue from a 1.5% excise tax on coal. Water Development Account II receives revenue from a 0.167% severance tax on oil and gas. Account I is utilized for new development proiects, and Account II is used to fund water proiects that have been in existence for 15 years or longer.
Contact: http://wwdc.state.wy.us/
Wyoming Water Resources Data System
The Water Resources Data System is a clearinghouse of hydrological and climatological data for the State of Wyoming. Funded from an allocation from the Wyoming Water Development Commission, the System offers a wide range of products and services to its users. As of 01 September 2001, the State Climatologist Office has been combined with WRDS in order to better integrate the functions of these two environmentally related disciplines.
Contact: http://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/
Rural Water Association
Wyoming Association of Rural Water Systems (WARWS) is a Non-profit Association, affiliated with National Rural Water Association (NRWA) that provides on-site, one-on-one technical assistance at no cost to small municipalities under 10,000 population and all rural water and wastewater districts throughout the state.
Contact: http://www.nrwa.org/warws/
Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts
The Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts provides leadership for the conservation of Wyoming's soil and water resources, promotes the control of soil erosion, promotes and protects the quality of Wyoming's waters, reduce siltation of stream channels and reservoirs, promote wise use of Wyoming's water, and all other natural resources, preserve and enhance wildlife habitat, protect the tax base and promote the health, safety and general welfare of the citizens of this state through a responsible conservation ethic.
Contact: http://www.conservewy.com/
Wyoming Water Association
No web site.
Wyoming Ground Water Foundation
No web site.
Wyoming Control Areas
Due to the large scale development of ground water for irrigation use in some areas of the state, three groundwater management districts called Control Areas have been established. An Advisory Group is elected in each of the Control Areas to review new permit applications, requests for water right changes, and advise the State Engineer's Office regarding such items.

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Stratigraphy and Potentiometric-surface map of HPA
  • Radon
  • Geohydrology
  • Groundwater pumping
  • Pesticides
WY USGS has not done any studies in the last 10 years to look at the Wyoming portion of the High Plains aquifer as a whole. Instead several small studies that looked at either local hydrologic conditions or were mainly data collection efforts. The data collection efforts include pesticide and radon sampling in several High Plains counties in Wyoming. The results of the sampling are available in several online USGS fact sheets (see URLs).
Year: Past 10 years
Location: http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/fs/FS-079-98/
http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/fs/FS-065-98/
http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/wri/wri994164/
http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/fs/fs03400/
http://wy.water.usgs.gov/pubs/statebiblio/index.htm
Contact: USGS
  • Well water levels
WY USGS collects water levels from about 40 wells in the High Plains as a cooperative project with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Most of these wells have data loggers on them that measure the water levels hourly, but several are only hand measured every couple of months. We publish the records from these wells annually in our data report. Unfortunately most if not all of these wells are affected by local pumping and do not represent regional water levels very well.
Year: Current
Location: http://wy.water.usgs.gov/pubs/adr/index.htm
Contact: USGS/State Engineer
  • Hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics
Recent interpretive studies done by WY USGS office include a report on the hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics of the Ogallala and White River aquifers in Cheyenne and a separate report on the geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer system in Chevenne.
Year:
Location:
Contact: USGS

 

Data Management

The Water Resources Data System is a clearinghouse of hydrological and climatological data for the State of Wyoming. See information above.
Location: http://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/
Access: Public

HPA Future Research Recommendations

WY USGS response--recharge, storage, and changes in storage in the High Plains aquifer in Wyoming. As part of that study a network of instrumented water-level observation wells in areas that are not affected by local pumping would be useful. Besides looking at the aquifer itself I think looking at movement of water through the unsaturated zone would be beneficial.

Another important need would be to look in more detail at the chemistry of the High Plains water. There are known issues with the natural quality of the water such as relatively high uranium and radon concentrations and also with man made chemicals, mainly nitrate.

New Mexico

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources (NMBGMR)
The NMBGMR, a division of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, is a non-regulatory agency charged with gathering and disseminating information related to the geology and natural resources of New Mexico. Primary activities include the preparation of maps of the state's geology and resource potential, information-gathering related to petroleum, coal, aggregate, water, geological hazards, and environmental concerns, archiving geological samples, and disseminating information through reports, maps, publications, queries from individuals and organizations, and educational programs. NMBGMR research staff provides expertise in field geology, geochemistry, hydrogeology, geophysics, and economic geology, and dissemination of information is facilitated through publications and cartography departments and outreach programs.
Contact: http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/
New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (OSE)
New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission (ISC)
The OSE and the ISC are separate but companion agencies charged with administering the state's water resources. The agencies have power over the supervision, measurement, appropriation, and distribution of almost all surface and ground water in New Mexico, including streams and rivers that cross state boundaries.

The OSE is responsible for water rights administration, making hydrographic surveys for water rights adjudication, performing water resource investigations, inspecting dams for safety, rehabilitating diversion dams and ditches, reviewing subdivision water supply proposals received from New Mexico counties, and issuing water well-driller licenses.

The ISC has broad powers to investigate, protect, conserve and develop the stream systems of the state. The ISC administers interstate stream compacts, funds water research, conservation and development projects, and regional planning projects, oversees interstate litigation, cooperates in the planning of federal water projects, provides financial assistance for the construction of irrigation works, and administers the state's regional water planning program.
Contact: http://www.ose.state.nm.us/
New Mexico Environment Department (ED)
Provide the highest quality of life throughout the state by promoting a safe, clean, and productive environment. Responsible for water quality oversight.
Contact: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Well levels
  • Ground water flow simulations
The OSE and USGS monitor water levels in the New Mexico portion of the HPA and have conducted ground water flow simulations for parts of the HPA. Summaries of modeling efforts and regional syntheses of water-level data are presented in USGS Water-Resources Investigations Reports.
Year: Ongoing
Location:
Contact: OSE/USGS
  • HPA ground water model
The OSE has recently developed two ground water models for the HPAS in Lea and Curry and Roosevelt counties in eastern New Mexico. These models are being used to predict water level declines due to current and future water uses. They are also being used as a tool to help in the ongoing regional water planning efforts to manage the state's water resources. Reports and electronic copies of the models are available from OSE for a nominal fee.
Year: Current
Location:
Contact: OSE

 

Other Hydrologic and Geologic Research in New Mexico
Research TopicResearch Summary, Contact
Recent water-related studies in New Mexico have focused largely on the Rio Grande valley and adjacent groundwater basins because a large proportion of the state's population and agricultural activity is concentrated in those areas. The OSE/ISC has been conducting studies for all ground water basins in the state to aid in planning, policy, regulation, and protection of the state's water resources.
Delineation of hydrogeologic units
Delineation of hydrogeologic units and their 3-dimensional distribution in the unconsolidated aquifer system (Santa Fe Group) underlying the middle Rio Grande basin.
Characterization of aquifer properties
Characterization of aquifer properties (Kx, Kz) and regional flow systems using borehole geophysical (temperature) logs in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, middle Rio Grande basin.
Characterization of aquifer properties
Assessment and characterization of hydrogeologic units, their 3-dimensional distribution, and hydrologic significance in the Espanola basin.
Water availability
Water availability assessment for Placitas area, middle Rio Grande basin, incorporating geologic controls, water-level and spring-discharge records, and hydrochemical data.
Withdrawals
Numerical estimates of land subsidence due to water withdrawals (pumping) from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, middle Rio Grande basin.
Natural and mining-related impacts
Assessment of natural and mining-related impacts to the Red River of northern New Mexico, using hydrochemical and geochemical data.
Surface water systems
The OSE/ISC is currently involved in managing the surface water system of the state. Surface water models are being developed to simulate stream flows for the major streams in the state. These models account for evaporation losses, seepage, diversion, and water consumption by vegetation along stream reaches. This work is being conducted in cooperation with federal and state agencies.

Data Management

A project recently initiated by OSE, the Water Administration Technical Engineering Resource System (WATERS), is beginning to provide data management. The elements of the system include water rights administration, subdivision review, metering, hydrographic surveys, adjudication, abstracting, decision support systems, imaging, numeric models, mapping, and so on. Inclusive to the system is the Enterprise GIS (E-GIS) component that is in the final building phase to integrate data, hardware, software, and staff into a system that is connected to the water rights data. The E-GIS will provide the most accurate mapping of points of diversion, places of use, and conveyances.
Location: http://www.ose.state.nm.us/water-info/index.htmI
Access: Public

Water-related information available from NMBGMR is largely in the form of published reports that provide hydrogeological information in addition to water level and water quality data. For the HPA, Ground Water Reports are available for Lea and Quay counties.
Location:
Access: Public

The Earth Data Analysis Center (EDAC), a service organization of the University of New Mexico, provides a variety of geospatial data resources and services. EDAC is a partner in the New Mexico Resource Geographic Information System (RGIS), which provides a clearinghouse for GIS data for New Mexico. GIS vector coverages are provided in ESRI formats and include FGDC-compliant metadata. Most of the holdings are federal collections including digital aerial photography, digital raster graphics, terrain/topography, census, transportation, hydrography, and a host of specialized data including land ownership and natural resources. Data are downloadable in various formats and free of charge, or can be obtained by request for a nominal fee.
Location: http://rgis.unm.edu/
Access: Public

HPA Future Research Recommendations

South Dakota

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
South Dakota Geological Survey
To conduct geologic studies, hydrologic studies, and research; and to collect, correlate, preserve, interpret, and disseminate information, leading to a better understanding of the geology and hydrology of South Dakota. Special emphasis is placed on ground-water quantity and quality and other natural resources of economic value. The Survey has no regulatory authority; instead, it provides information and interpretations on natural resources and related issues, and assists agencies and individuals in making well-informed decisions.
Contact: http://www.sdgs.usd.edu/
South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)
The DENR mission is to provide environmental and natural resources assessment, financial assistance, and regulation in a customer service manner that protects the public health, conserves natural resources, preserves the environment, and promotes economic development.
Contact: http://www.state.sd.us/denr/denr.html
South Dakota Water Management Board
A major addition to the water rights laws occurred in 1955. Legislation was enacted making use of ground water also subject to the doctrine of prior appropriation. In addition, a provision was inserted allowing anyone to claim a vested water right for water uses predating March 2, 1955. The 1955 legislation also transferred the authority to issue water right permits from the state engineer to a citizen's board with a chief engineer making recommendations to the board. This citizen's board is now known as the Water Management Board and consists of seven members appointed by the Governor.
Contact: http://www.state.sd.us/denr/des/waterrights/wmb.htm

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Ground water flow model
Ground Water Flow Model of the Ogallala and Arikaree Aquifers in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area, South Dakota. The Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers are important water resources in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area and are used extensively for irrigation, municipal, and domestic water supplies. Continued or increased withdrawals from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area have the potential to affect water levels in these aquifers. This report describes a conceptual model of ground-water flow in these aquifers and documents the development and calibration of a numerical model.
Year: Current
Location: Future USGS Water Investigations Report
Contact: SD USGS
  • Geologic units
A county study of water resources documents data collected that describe units that make up the High Plains aquifer in Todd and Mellette Counties (Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers). Included are structure contour maps, hydrogeologic sections, water-level hydrographs, and potentiometric surface maps.
Year: 1998
Location: Carter, J.M., 1998, Water Resources of Mellette and Todd Counties, South Dakota: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 98-4146, 68 p.
Contact: USGS

 

Other Hydrogeologic Research in South Dakota

Not available.

Data Management

Not available.

HPA Future Research Recommendatious

Colorado

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
Colorado Department of Natural Resources (DNR):
  • Division of Water Resources--State Engineer's Office, (water rights and water supply regulation)
  • Colorado Water Conservation Board (water conservation projects)
  • Colorado Geological Survey (hydrogeological research and data gathering)
The Colorado Department of Natural Resources was created to develop, protect and enhance Colorado natural resources for the use and enjoyment of the state's present and future residents, as well as for visitors to the state.
Contact: http://www.dnr.state.co.us/

The Colorado Division of Water Resources strives to be a leader in the water community of Colorado and the western United States. This is accomplished by focusing on the following areas: people, water, and stewardship.
Contact: http://www.dnr.state.co.us/water/indexWater.asp

The Water Conservation Board purpose is to conserve, develop, protect, and manage Colorado's water for present and future generations.
Contact: http://www.cwcb.state.co.us/

Colorado Geological Survey's mission is to serve and inform the people of Colorado by providing sound geologic information and evaluation, and to educate the public about the important role of earth sciences in everyday life in Colorado. The Engineering and Enviromnental Geology Section provides geoscience expertise regarding geologic hazards, water quality, and hydrogeology to safeguard life and promote wise use of land and natural resources in Colorado. Areas of expertise include: geologic mapping, water quality studies and monitoring, and hydrogeological (aquifer) characterization, analytical modeling.
Contact: http://geosurvey.state.co.us/

Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA):
  • Colorado State Conservation Board (water information for agriculture)
The Colorado State Conservation Board (CSCB) is a Division of the Department of Agriculture. Its activities are directed by a Board consisting of eight elected members from the Watersheds and one member appointed by the governor. The CSCB acts as a state board of appeals for the 77 conservation districts; administers and disburses funds for the purpose of assisting the districts; acts in an advisory capacity with the districts; coordinates the programs of all districts; undertakes studies of watershed planning; develops, implements and administers watershed flood prevention and underground water storage projects; accepts grants, services and materials for conservation purposes.
Contact: http://www.ag.state.co.us/soils/soils. html
Colorado Department of Public Health and Enviromnent (DPHE):
  • Water Quality Control Commission (water quality regulation)
  • Water Quality Control Division (implementation)
The Colorado Water Quality Control Commission is the administrative agency responsible for developing specific state water quality policies, in a manner that implements the broader policies set forth by the Legislature in the Colorado Water Quality Control Act. The Commission adopts water quality classifications and standards for surface and ground waters of the state, as well as various regulations aimed at achieving compliance with those classifications and standards.
Contact: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/op/wqcc/wqcchom.asp

The Water Quality Control Division is the agency responsible for implementing and enforcing the regulations adopted by the Water Quality Control Commission, as well as applicable regulations adopted by the State Board of Health. The Division regulates the discharge of pollutants into state waters and enforces the state regulations governing public water supplies.
Contact: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/wq/wqhom.asp
Water Conservation Districts
There are three Water Conservation Districts in Colorado: Colorado River Water Conservation District, Rio Grande Water Conservation District, and Southwestern Water Conservation District.
Contact: http://www.crwcd.gov/
http://www.waterinfo.orglhistory.html
http://www.waterknowledge.colostate.edu/wcdriog.htm
Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB)
The Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) was created in 1937 for the purpose of aiding in the protection and development of the waters of the state. The Mission Statement of the CWCB is: Conserve, Develop, Protect and Manage Colorado's Water for Present and Future Generations.
Contact: http://cwcb.state.co.us/
Ground Water Commission (GWC)
The Colorado Ground Water Commission is a regulatory and an adjudicatory body authorized to manage and control designated ground water resources, including the Ogallala aquifer, within the State of Colorado. The Ground Water Commission adopts rules and policies related to issuing large capacity well permits and changes in ground water rights within the Designated Ground Water Basins. Currently the Commission has established 8 designated ground water basins and 13 ground water management districts within these basins. Personnel of the Colorado Division of Water Resource serve as the technical staff for the Commission.
Contact: http://water.state.co.us/cgwc/
Division of Water Resources (DWR)
The Division of Water Resources administers and enforces all surface and ground water rights throughout the State of Colorado, issues water well permits, approves construction and repair of dams, and enforces interstate compacts. The Division of Water Resources is also the agency responsible for implementing and enforcing the statutes of the Ground Water Management Act passed by the Legislature as well as implementing applicable rules and policies adopted by the Colorado Ground Water Commission and the State Board of Examiners of Water Well Construction and Pump Installation Contractors.
Contact: http://water.state.co.us/

 

Hydrogeologic HPA Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Water users
  • Aquifer properties
Ground Water Atlas of Colorado. Target completion date is Feb. 2003. First version available through the Colorado Ground Water Association.
Year: 2003
Location: http://geosurvey.state.co.us/survey.html
Contact: CGS
  • Water levels
Each January the Division of Water Resources (DWR) monitors water levels in the Northern High Plains Designated Ground Water Basin and the Southern High Plains Ground Water Basin. These two ground water basins renresent the Ogallala in Colorado.
Year: Annually
Location: http://www.dnr.state.co.us/water/indexWater.asp
Contact: DWR
  • Depletion rates
Depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, Northern High Plains Designated Basin. The Ground Water Commission began to administer the Ogallala aquifer in 1965. Use was set at an acceptable rate of depletion. For the Northern High Plains use was set at 40% depletion in 25 years. The Division of Water Resources completed a study that focused on the actual denletion rate to the aquifer in the Northern High Plains.
Year: 1990
Location:http://www.dnr.state.co.us/water/indexWater.asp
Contact: DWR
  • Aquifer mapping
  • Aquifer characteristics
  • Storage estimates
  • Predictions of aquifer life
Hydrogeology and Water Resource of the Southern High Plains Designated Ground Water Basin. An extensive study of the Southern High Plains Basin that contains aquifer mapping, aquifer characteristics, storage estimates and predictions of aquifer life.
Year: 2002
Contact: Southern High Plains Ground Water Management District
  • Water quality
The DPHE and the CDA have conducted baseline water quality studies for the Ogallala.
Year: Ongoing
Contact: Department of Public Health and Environment and the Department of Agriculture.

 

Other Hydrogeologic Research in Colorado
Research TopicResearch Summary, Contact
Water Quality
The CGS is currently working on water quality studies related to natural acid rock drainage and abandoned mines.
Contact: CGS
Ground water contamination
The CGS is currently working on research related to ground water contaminant fate and transport related to former underground storage tanks for petroleum products, landfill areas, and other contaminants.
Contact: CGS

Data Management

No statewide data management system in place. State agencies collect data in their own databases. Some agencies, such as the Water Quality Control Division, are beginning to upload data in the EPA STORET database. A portion of this data will meet federal metadata standars.

HPA Future Research Recommendations

U.S. Geological Survey

Key AgenciesRole; Contact
US Geological Survey (USGS)
The Central Region, one of three USGS regions, is composed of fifteen states in the central portion of the United States. It is an administrative construct to facilitate regional sciences programs and administration of numerous USGS offices in these states. The USGS has offices in 74 cities in the Central Region and is composed of about 3,300 employees and 525 on-site contractors. The Regional Director's Office is located at the Denver Federal Center. The Regional Biologist's Office is also located at the Denver Federal Center and manages five Science Centers. The Sciences Centers provide the science needed to support the sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources. The Regional Geologist's Office is at the Denver Federal Center and manages five scientific teams: Crustal Imaging and Characterization; Earth Surface Processes; Energy Resources; Geologic Hazards, and Mineral Resources. The teams provide science on geologic hazards and resources and the Nation's geologic ftamework. The Regional Geographer's Office is in Rolla, MO and manages two Mapping Centers. These Centers provide the Nation's basic geospatial data and imagery, ensuring access to and advancing the application of these data and other Earth science information for users worldwide. The Regional Hydrologist's Office is at the Denver Federal Center, and manages fifteen distributed District Offices. There is one District Office in each of the region's fifteen states, most of which are in State capitals. These Offices provide the hydrologic information and understanding needed by others to achieve the best use and management of the Nation's water resources.
Contact: http://www.usgs.gov/

 

Hydrogeologic Research
Research TopicResearch Summary; Year; Location; Contact
  • Aquifers
Ground Water Atlas of the United States Segment 3; Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska. Year: 1997. Author: U.S. Geological Survey
Contact: U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Investigations Atlas 730-D
  • Base characterization
The USGS is conducting a study to characterize the base of alluvial aquifer using geophysical techniques for the COHYST Group.
Contact: Greg Steele, USGS Nebraska District Office
The USGS is conducting a study in Nebraska to map the base of selected reservoirs in the State to determine the available volume in the reservoir
Year: Ongoing
Contact: USGS
  • Contamination
The USGS, for the US EPA, monitors or assists with the characterization of contaminated sites in Nebraska.
Year: Ongoing
Contact: USGS
  • Discharge
Estimated predevelopment discharge to streams from the High Plains aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma, southwestern Kansas, and northwestern Texas: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4287, 28 pp.
Year: 1998
Contact: Luckey, R.R. and Becker, M.F.
  • Evapostranspiration
The USGS is conducting a study to estimate evapotranspiration in riparian areas along the Platte River for the Platte River Cooperative Hydrology Study (COHYST) Group
Year: Ongoing
Contact: USGS
  • Ground Water Modeling
Simulation of ground water on the Rosebud Indian Reservation, southwestern South Dakota
Year:
Contact: Larry Putnam, South Dakota District Office
Republican River Basin Ground Water Modeling Project
Year: Current
Contact: Matt Landon, Nebraska District Office
Digital Simulation of Ground-water Flow in the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. 1986. Authors: Luckey R.R. et al.
Contact: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-D
Simulated response of the High Plains aquifer to ground-water withdrawals in the Upper Republican Natural Resources District, Nebraska: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 95-4014, 60 p.
Year: 1995
Contact: Peckenpaugh, Jon M., Kern, Rich A., Dugan, Jack T., and Kilpatrick, John M.
  • Geohydrology
Geohydrology of the High Plains Aquifer system, Cheyenne urban area, Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 92-4047, 4 p.
Year: 1994
Contact: Cooley, M.E. and Crist, M.A.
The USGS is conducting a study to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of the High Plains aquifer in the North Platte NRD.
Contact: Greg Steele, USGS Nebraska District Office
  • Geohydrology
  • Water Quality
Geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River Alluvial Aquifer, Garden County, western Nebraska, 1993-94: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 98-4033, 75 p.
Year: 1998
Contact: Steele, G.V., Cannia, J.C., and Stanton, J.S.
  • History of water use
Ogallala; Water for a Dry Land. University of Nebraska Press. 2nd ed.
Year: 2000
Contact: J. Opie
  • Hydrology
Platte River Cooperative Hydrology Study (COHYST)
Contact: Dick Luckey, Central Region--Water Discipline Office, Denver, Colorado
  • Hydrogeology
  • Water Use
  • Simulation of Flow
Hydrogeology, water use, and simulation of flow in the High Plains aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma, southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas, northeastern New Mexico, and northwestern Texas: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4104, 68 p.
Year: 1998
Contact: Luckey, Richard L. and Becker, Mark F.
  • Hydrologic and Chemical Interaction
Hydrologic and chemical interaction of the Arkansas River and Equus Beds aquifer between Hutchinson and Wichita, south-central Kansas: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 95-4191, 100 pp.
Year: 1996
Contact: Myers, N.C., Hargadine, G.D., and Gillespie, J.B.
  • Hydrologic influence
Hydrologic and ecologic influence of playa basins in the Southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico: based on U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report 94-702, 6 p.
Year: 1994
Contact: Woodward, D.G.
  • Nonpoint-source Contamination
Assessment of non point-source contamination of High Plains Aquifer in south-central Kansas, 1987: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2381-C, 51 p.
Year: 1994
Contact: Helgesen, J.O., Stullken, L.E., and Rutledge, A.T.
  • Recharge
Rapid recharge of parts of the High Plains Aquifer indicated by a reconnaissance study in Oklahoma, 1999: FS-137-00, 4 p.
Year: 2000
Contact: Andrews, William J., Osborn, Noel I., and Luckey, Richard R.
Ground-water recharge in the southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico: FS-127-99, 4 p.
Year: 2000
Contact: Wood, Warren W.
  • Surface and Ground Water Interaction
Surface-water/ground-water interaction and implications for ground-water sustainability in the Dutch Flats area, western Nebraska: FS-074-01,4 p.
Year: 2001
Contact: Steele, Gregory V., Verstraeten, Ingrid M., and Cannia, James C.
Interaction of surface water and ground water in the Dutch Flats area, western Nebraska, 1995-99: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4070, 56 p.
Year: 2001
Contact: Verstraeten, I.M., Steele, G.V., Cannia, J.C., Hitch, D.E., Scripter, K.G., Bohlke, J.K., Kraemer, T.F., and Stanton, J.S.
Interaction of streams and ground water in selected tributaries of the Republican River, Nebraska, 1998-99: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4200, 6 p.
Year: 1999
Contact: Steele, G.V.
  • SWAP
Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP)
Contact: Eric Strom, Texas District Office
  • Water chemistry
  • Physical characteristics
  • Stream habitat
  • Aquatic life
The USGS has assessed water chemistry, physical characteristics, stream habitat, and aquatic life to provide insights for current and emerging water issues in the surface and ground waters of the South Platte River Basin Study in the National Water Quality Assessment program
Contact: Suzanne Paschke, USGS Colorado District Office
  • Water Flow
Water flow in the High Plains Aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma: FS-081-00, 4 p.
Year: 2000
Contact: Luckey, Richard R., Osborn, Noel I., Becker, Mark F., and Andrews, William J.
Simulation of ground-water flow in the High Plains Aquifer, southern sandhills area, west-central Nebraska: U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report 96- 206, 16 p.
Year: 1997
Contact: McLean, J.S., Chen, H.H., and Goeke,J.W.
The USGS is conducting a study to characterize ground-water flow and contaminate transport near York, Nebraska as part of the High Plains Regional Ground Water Study in the National Water Quality Assessment Program.
Contact: Matt Landon, USGS Nebraska District Office
The USGS is conducting a study to characterize ground-water flow in the Loup City, Nebraska area.
Contact: Greg Steele, USGS Nebraska District Office
  • Water Levels
High Plains Water-Level Monitoring Program
Year: Current
Contact: Virginia McGuire, Nebraska District Office
Water levels on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, southwestern South Dakota
Contact: Janet Carter, South Dakota District Office
Water-level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer--Predevelopment to 1991. Year 1993. Authors: McGrath, T., Dugan J.T.
Contact: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 93-4088
Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1999. U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet FS-029-01, available from the web at http://www-ne.cr.usgs.gov/highplains/hp_99_web_report/FS-029-01.pdf
Contact: McGuire, V.L., USGS Nebraska District Office
Stanton, J.S., 2000, Areas of gain and loss along the Platte River, Central Nebraska, Spring 1999: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4065
Year: 1999
Contact: USGS
Water Table in the High Plains Aquifer in 1978 in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Authors: Gutentag, E.D., Weeks, J.B.
Year: 1980
Contact: U.S. Geological Survey, Hydrological Investigations Atlas HA-642, Open-file Report 80-50. Lakewood, CO
  • Water Quality
National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's High Plains Regional Ground-Water Quality (HPGW) Study
Year: Current
Contact: Kevin Dennehy, Colorado District Office
National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's Central Nebraska Basins Study
Year: Current
Contact: Ron Zeit, Nebraska District Office
Distribution of nitrate in ground water in the Republican River basin, southwest Nebraska, 1996-98: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4056, 6 p.
Year: 2000
Contact: Stanton, Jennifer S.
Nitrate and other water-quality characteristics, and nitrate in the unsaturated zone, in the Red Willow and Hitchcock Counties Special Protection Area, southwest Nebraska, 1993-95: U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Report 98-4138, 71 pp.
Year: 1998
Contact: Steele, G.V.
Frenzel, S.A., Swanson, RB., Huntzinger, T.L., Stamer, J.K. Emmons, P.J. Zeit RB., 1998, Water Quality in the Central Nebraska Basins, Nebraska, 1992-95: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1163
Year: 1998
Contact: USGS
The USGS collects ground- and surface-water data related to water quality and quantity and publishes this data in the Nebraska annual data report.
Contact: Phil Soenksen, USGS Nebraska District Office
The USGS is conducting a study to evaluate the effects of bank filtration on ground-water quality in ground water that has been recently recharged with surface water
Contact: Jason Vogel, USGS Nebraska District Office
  • Water Storage
Monitoring ground-water storage change in the central and southern High Plains using remote sensing, central United States
Contact: Don Pool, Arizona District Office
  • Water Use
Computing water use in the North Fork of the Red River, Oklahoma and Texas
Year:
Contact: Jason Masoner, Oklahoma District Office
  • Water Resources
Water resources of Mellette and Todd Counties, South Dakota: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 98-4146, 68 p.
Year: 1998
Contact: Carter, Janet M.

Data Management

As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) program of disseminating water data to the public, the USGS maintains a distributed network of computers and fileservers for the storage and retrieval of water data collected through its activities at approximately 1.5 million sites around the country. This system is called the National Water Information System (NWIS). Many types of data are stored in this NWIS network, including: site information, time-series (flow, stage, precipitation, chemical), peak flow, ground water, water quality. NWIS data comes from all 50 states, selected territories and border stations, from 1896 to present. Of the 1.5M sites with NWIS data, 80% are wells; 350,000 are water quality sites; and 19,000 are streamflow sites, of which over 5,000 are real-time.

The goal of NWISWeb is to provide both internal and external users of USGS water information with an easy to use, geographically-seamless interface to the large volume of USGS water data maintained on 48 separate NWIS databases nationwide via the internet. Data is updated from the NWlS sites on a regularly scheduled basis; real-time data is transmitted to NWlSWeb several times a day. NWlSWeb provides several output options: real-time streamflow, water-levels and water quality graphs, data tables and site maps; tabular output in html and ASCII tab delimited files; lists of selected sites as summaries with reselection for details. Data are retrieved by category of data, such as surface water, ground water, or water quality; and by geographic area. Further refinement is possible by selecting specific information and by defining the output desired. NWISWeb contains about 4.3 million Water Quality Samples; and 64 million Water Quality Sampling Results.
Access: Public

The USGS annually monitors ground-water levels in thousands of wells in the United States. Ground-water level data are collected and stored as either discrete ground-water level measurements or as continuous record. Data from some of the continuous record stations are relayed to USGS offices nationwide through telephone lines or by satellite transmissions providing access to realtime ground-water data.
Location: Local offices
Access: Public

The High Plains NAWQA does have a central data repository for its chemical data and a separate repository for its GIS data. The central repository for the chemical data collected is a MS Access data base that includes all chemical data archived in the USGS NWIS system (GWSI and QWDATA) and all non-NWIS chemical data from special studies. The GIS data is stored in a single location on computer disk. The types of chemical data stored in NWIS for ground water include nutrients, major ions, trace elements, volatile organic compounds, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides and their metabolites, radon, radium, and tritium. There is also non-NWIS data for cores, cuttings and unsaturated-zone pore water; these include isotope data (carbon, boron, strontium, oxygen, and helium), x-ray diffraction data, organic carbon, pH, dissolved gasses (Ne, He, N2, CFC's, CH4, CO2, and O2), major ions, tritium, moisture content of sediment and texture, hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention, and physical and thermal properties of sediment. All of the chemical data (NWIS and non-NWIS) becomes accessible over the web after it has undergone QA checking and the interpretive reports have been published. The chemical data stored in NWIS is also available to the public through NWIS web and the NAWQA data warehouse. The GIS data is mostly available to the public from published National data sets that have been "clipped" to the boundary of the High Plains.
Access: Public

HPA Future Research Recommendations


Kansas Geological Survey, Geohydrology
Placed online July 2004, origical report dated Jan. 2003
Comments to webadmin@kgs.ku.edu
The URL for this page is http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Hydro/Publications/2003/OFR03_54/appendix.html