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Kansas Geological Survey, Bulletin 52, part 5, originally published in 1944


Mined Areas of the Weir-Pittsburg Coal Bed

by G. E. Abernathy

Cover of the book; gray paper; black text.

Originally published in 1944 as Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin 52, part 5. This is, in general, the original text as published. The information has not been updated. An Acrobat PDF version of this report is available (4 MB). Plate available separately.

Abstract

The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed crops out in a narrow belt across the southeastern corner of Kansas. From the eastern limit of its outcrop it has been mined by stripping methods in areas where the overburden was less than 50 feet. The area of deep mines or shafts extends westward from the stripped areas for a distance of about 5 or 6 miles. The depth to the coal bed in the regions worked by the deep mines ranges from 25 to 285 feet. The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed lies near the middle of the Cherokee shale; however, the interval between the top of the Cherokee and the coal bed is not constant but ranges from 165 to 225 feet. The thickness of the coal bed ranges from 32 to 43 inches.

Large areas of coal have not yet been worked, but in most cases the unworked coal is in the deeper part of the field.

Plate

Plate 1--Map of mined areas of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed
available as an Adobe Acrobat file (52 MB)

Introduction

Purpose of the report

During the fuel shortage of 1942, numerous inquiries concerning the unmined areas of coal in the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed were directed to the Geological Survey. At the request of officials of the coal-mining companies, a map showing location of the active mines and the old mine workings was prepared. This map was used in a report to the Federal Government to indicate favorable locations for deep mechanized mines. Mine regions worked since 1942 and some corrections and additions to the original map have been incorporated in the map of the worked areas of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed that accompanies this report.

Acknowledgments

This opportunity is taken to thank officials of coal-mining companies that have operated or are operating in -the field; particularly those of the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Company, the Central Coal and Coke Company, and the Western Coal and Mining Company for access to their drill records and mine maps. The Mackie-Clemens Coal Company; the Commercial Fuel Company, and the Klaner Coal Company also furnished valuable information. The St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Company furnished a number of maps. Data and maps in the State Mine Inspector's office were used freely in compiling the map of the worked areas of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed. The manuscript was critically read by John C. Frye, Acting State Geologist.

Previous work

The first detailed report published on Kansas coal is by Haworth and Crane (1898). A large part of this report deals with the Weir-Pittsburg bed in southeastern Kansas. More recent reports which contain information on the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed are by Young and Allen (1925), Moore and Landes (1927), and Pierce and Courtier (1937). In 1936 Abernathy, in a thesis submitted to the University of Kansas, discussed the Cherokee rocks in southeastern Kansas and the relation of the Weir-Pittsburg and other beds to the cyclothems in the Cherokee section. A chapter on coal is included in a report on "Kansas mineral resources for wartime industries" (Jewett and Schoewe, 1942, pp. 77-88).

Geography

Location of the area

The location of the worked area of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed is shown in Plate 1. The area that has been worked in southeastern Kansas is an irregularly shaped, elliptical area extending from northeast to southwest from the vicinity of Arcadia through eastern Crawford and northern Cherokee counties. The line of outcrop of the coal bed passes from a point near Arcadia southward along the Kansas-Missouri boundary to a point east of Pittsburg, then westward to the southeastern area of Pittsburg, and then southwestward though a point about 5 miles south of Scammon.

Topography

The area of active mining and the mined-out areas of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed comprise a broad, relatively level erosional plane that truncates the outcropping edges of the soft easily eroded beds of sand, sandy shale, and coal of the Cherokee shale. The surface of the ground slopes to the west at an average rate of about 10 feet to the mile in the worked areas of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed. Farther west the surface rises to the escarpment of the resistant members of the Fort Scott limestone.

History of Mining

The early history of the development of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed is not well recorded. The earliest record of its mining (Haworth, 1898) indicates that coal was mined sometime between 1850 and 1860. In 1866, coal was obtained from the outcrop of the Weir-Pittsburg bed in Cherokee county and hauled by wagon to Granby, Missouri, where it was used as blacksmith coal.

The earliest operations were in strip mines or wagon-pit mines along the banks of creeks. Strip mining was done in this district before the Civil War. The thin overburden was removed by horses and scrapers, and the coal was loaded by hand into wagons. The first railroad to be built in the district was the Missouri River, Fort Scott and Gulf Railroad (later the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis and now the Saint Louis and San Francisco), which was completed to Baxter Springs in 1870. Four years later the first shaft mine was opened by Scammon Brothers near the present town of Scammon. In the early history of the district, coal was hoisted from the mines by a horse "whim." Later, steam hoists were used in the larger mines, and gasoline engines were used in the smaller mines. More recently, electric hoists have replaced all of the steam hoists and most of the gasoline hoists. The room and pillar system is used in the deep mines. Figure 1 illustrates this system of mining, and shows the average size of mine workings and room pillars.

Figure 1--Section of a mine map showing room and pillar system of mining and ratio of faulty coal areas to mined areas.

Section of a mine map showing room and pillar system of mining and ratio of faulty coal areas to mined areas.

Railroad contractors soon became interested in the problem of removing the overburden by mechanical means. In 1877, the Hoges-Armil Coal Company began using a steam shovel to remove the overburden from the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed near Pittsburg. This was the first use of a steam shovel in strip coal mining in the United States. The first revolving shovel in this area was used in 1905; it had a 2-yard dipper and was designed to remove 15 feet of overburden. Larger shovels with 3-yard, dippers were used in this field in 1911. Shovels having a boom 75 feet long and a dipper of 6 cubic yards capacity were in common use in 1915. There has been a gradual increase in the size of shovels between 1920 and the present time. The largest shovel now in operation has a boom 90 feet long and is capable of stripping to a depth of 50 feet or more; the capacity of the dipper is 30 cubic yards.

Stratigraphy

Position of the Cherokee shale in the stratigraphic column

The Cherokee shale is the lowest division of the Pennsylvanian system in Crawford and Cherokee counties, Kansas. It rests unconformably upon the uneven surface of rocks belonging to the Mississippian system.

The Cherokee shale

The Cherokee shale includes all of the strata between the base of the Fort Scott limestone and the upper uneven surface of the Mississippian rocks; it consists of shales, sandstones, sandy shales, a few thin beds of limestone, and 14 beds of coal. Nine of these coal beds are being mined at the present time. The average thickness of the Cherokee shale, where the complete section is present and is overlain by the Fort Scott limestone, in Crawford and Cherokee counties is about 450 feet. The Cherokee is absent in the southeastern part of Cherokee county where it has been removed by erosion. In other parts of the area its thickness ranges from a fraction of an inch near the outcrop of the Mississippian limestone to 455 feet near the outcrop of the Fort Scott limestone.

The character of the rocks and the kind of fossils contained indicate that the Cherokee shale was deposited in a basin in which the sea advanced and retreated a number of times. During the periods of time when the sea covered the basin, marine limestone, sandstone, and shale were deposited; while the sea was absent from the basin, nonmarine sandstone and beds of coal accumulated. Each advance and withdrawal of the sea is indicated by a definite sequence of beds. The members of this sequence, beginning at the bottom, are sandstone, underclay, coal, black shale, gray shale, limestone, and calcareous shale.

The Cherokee shale crops out in a northeast-southwest belt across southeastern Kansas. Its outcrop area covers the southeastern part of Crawford county and all of Cherokee county excepting the extreme southeastern corner and the extreme northwestern corner.

The position of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed in the Cherokee shale

The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed lies about 250 feet above the base of the Cherokee shale and about 200 feet below the top, where the complete section of the Cherokee is present. The coal beds of commercial importance in the Cherokee shale are, in ascending order, the Riverton, which lies at the base of the Cherokee; the Columbus, which lies about 150 feet above the base of the Cherokee and just beneath the Bluejacket sandstone; the Knifeton, which lies about 25 feet above the Bluejacket sandstone; the Weir-Pittsburg; which occurs about 25 feet above the Knifeton; the Mineral coal bed, which lies about 80 feet above the Weir-Pittsburg; and-the Fleming, Croweburg, Bevier, and Mulky (Fort Scott), which lie above the Mineral coal.

The Weir-Pittsburg Coal Bed

The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed was first known as the "Pittsburg lower" (Haworth, 1895). It was also called "Weir-Pittsburg lower" by Haworth (1895) and by Greene and Pond (1926). For a number of years the bed has been known as the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed and also as the Cherokee coal bed. In 1936 at a conference on the nomenclature of the beds in the Cherokee shale, staff members of the State Geological Survey of Kansas and a representative from the Missouri Bureau of Geology and Water Resources considered names that were in common usage. Weir-Pittsburg was adopted as the name to be used in Survey publications.

The mined-out areas of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed are shown on plate 1. On this map the areas in which coal has been mined from shafts (or deep mines) are differentiated from the areas that have been stripped. This map was prepared from the best information now available, but it probably does not completely show the mined-out areas. Some mines may have been worked that are not recorded on this map, and the areas of many mine workings may have been extended after the most recent mine map was made. All of the mined-out areas shown on this map were drawn from individual mine maps obtained from the offices of the State Mine Inspection Department, the major coal-mining companies, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Company, and the Saint Louis-San Francisco Railway Company.

The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed dips with the other beds of the Cherokee shale to the north of west at an average rate of 20 feet to the mile. The worked area extends from the outcrop for a distance of about 6 miles in a direction north of west. The western limit of the known workable area in Crawford and Cherokee counties is defined by the presence of a channel sandstone replacing the coal or thin discontinuous sandstone and shale lenses separating the coal bed into thin bands. The width of this sandy facies is unknown. However, in the southern part of the coal field, the coal is known to be of workable grade in a large part of Labette county. A coal bed about 3 feet thick has been mined in the McCune area in western Crawford county. This thickness is comparable to the average thickness of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed ill the mined areas. The coal in these western areas has not been mined extensively, however, because of the higher mining costs at greater depth.

The average depth of the coal bed in the areas mined by deep shafts is about 150 feet. The depths of the shafts range from 25 feet to a maximum of 285 feet at the Sheridan Mine No. 21, located about 2 miles west of Arma, Kansas, and operated by the Quality Coal Company.

The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed is more uniform in thickness than any other coal bed in the Cherokee shale of southeastern Kansas. The average thickness of the bed in the northern part of the field is 32 inches. The bed thickens toward the south where the average thickness is about 43 inches. In Labette county some well logs record a maximum thickness of 58 inches of Weir-Pittsburg coal at a depth of about 600 feet.

Erosional unconformities

The top of the Weir-Pittsburg bed is characterized by small areas where sandstone or sandy shale is in contact with the top of the coal bed. Commonly a black shale is in contact with the top of the coal. These sandstone areas have a very irregular pattern but are more or less connected. They probably represent sections of stream channels that were filled with sand or sandy shale when the coal bed was near the surface. The bases of these old stream channels, or the bases of the present sandstone lenses, are above the top of the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed in most areas. In many areas the bases of the old stream channels have been cut down into the coal bed, or in some areas the coal bed has been cut out completely. In mines where the coal bed is overlain by a lens of sandstone or sandy shale, the roof of the mine workings requires some kind of support; the miners' term for this condition is a "fault." The coal miners' "fault" has no relation to a geological fault, but it indicates that conditions for mining the coal are faulty. The Weir-Pittsburg coal bed is the only bed of coal in the Cherokee shale which is characterized by "faults." From 10 to 15 percent of the coal in the mined-out areas is unmined because of the presence of "faults."

Horsebacks

Horsebacks are nearly vertical fractures or fissures that have cut across the coal bed and have been filled with clay material which resembles fire clay or soapstone. The width of the horsebacks ranges from a few inches to several feet. These fractures are probably due to regional crustal disturbances and to differential compaction of the sediments above the irregular and warped Mississippian limestone surface. Horsebacks are common in the Weir-Pittsburg coal bed.

Analyses of Weir-Pittsburg Coal

Coal from the Weir-Pittsburg bed is of high quality. Analyses made at the University of Kansas (Young and Allen, 1925) indicate that the moisture content ranges from 2.01 to 3.83 percent. The ash content ranges from 6.43 ,to 12.34 percent, and the heating value ranges from 12,870 to 14,080 B.t.u.

Production of Weir-Pittsburg Coal

The exact total production of coal from the Weir-Pittsburg bed is not known. The total production of coal from 1885 to 1943 from the shaft mines of Crawford and Cherokee counties, all of which produce from the Weir-Pittsburg bed, is 175,750,014 tons. The coal that has been mined by strip mining from the Weir-Pittsburg bed in Kansas is probably several million tons, which would bring the total production of coal from the Weir-Pittsburg bed to approximately 200,000,000 tons.

References

Abernathy, G. E., 1937, The Cherokee group of southeastern Kansas: Kansas Geol. Soc., Guidebook 11th Ann. Field Conference, pp. 18-23, figs, 5, 6.

Abernathy, G. E., , 1938, Cyclical sedimentation of the Cherokee: Kansas Acad. Sci. Trans., vol. 41, pp. 193-197.

Greene, F. C., and Pond, W. F., 1926, The geology of Vernon County, Missouri: Missouri Bur. Geology and Mines, 2d ser., vol. 19, pp. 1-152, figs. 1-14, pls. 1-14.

Haworth, Erasmus, 1895, The coal fields of Kansas: Kansas Univ. Quart., vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 297-309.

Haworth, Erasmus, and Crane, W. R., 1898, Special report on coal: Kansas Univ. Geol. Survey, vol. 3, pp. 1-347, figs. 1-54, pls. 1-70 .

Jewett, J. M., and Schoewe, W. H., 1942, Kansas mineral resources for wartime industries: Kansas Geol. Survey, Bull. 41, pt. 3, pp. 69-180, figs. 1-13.

Landes, K. K., 1937, Mineral resources of Kansas counties: Kansas Geol. Survey, Min. Resources Circ. 6, pp. 1-110. [available online]

Moore, R. C., 1929, Kansas, coal fields: U. S. Bur. Mines, Tech. Paper 445, pp. 3-7, figs. 1, 2.

Pierce, W. G., and Courtier, W. H., 1937, Geology and coal resources of the southeastern Kansas coal field in Crawford, Cherokee and Labette counties: Kansas Geol. Survey, Bull. 24, pp. 1-122, pls. 1-12, figs. 1-13. [available online]

Young, C. M., and Allen, H. C., 1925, Kansas coal: Kansas Univ. Bull., vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 1-202; Kansas Univ. Eng. Bull. 13 and Chem. Research Div. Bull. 4.

Register of Mines

No. on
map
Company Mine
no.
Location
Sec. T.S. R.E.
8 Arcadia Coal Co. 1 12 28 25
261 Atkinson Coal Co. 4 13 32 23
247 B and B Coal Co.   1 32 23
23 Barnum Coal Co. 1 26 28 25
225 Barrett Coal Co. 1 23 31 24
196 Barrett Coal Co. 6 11 31 24
234 Beinhart and Hardester   28 31 24
236 Bennett Coal Co 1 29 31 24
31 Black Crown Coal Co.   34 28 25
82 Black Crown (Active) 2 31 29 25
276 Boyd Coal Co. (Slope) 1 24 32 23
167 Broadhurst Coal Co. 2 29 30 25
182 Broadhurst & Coughenour   1 31 24
64 Burgess Coal Co. (Slope) 1 12 29 25
72 Burnett Coal Co. 1 22 29 25
114 Canal Fuel Co. (Central Coal & Coke) 14 36 30 24
147 Central Coal & Coke Co. 2 15 30 25
149 Central Coal & Coke Co. 3 15 30 25
150 Central Coal & Coke Co. 4 15 30 25
151 Central Coal & Coke Co. 5 15 30 25
152 Central Coal & Coke Co. 6 15 30 25
280 Central Coal & Coke Co. 7 6 32 24
153 Central Coal & Coke Co. 8 15 30 25
85 Central Coal & Coke Co. 9 34 29 25
154 Central Coal & Coke Co. 11 15 30 25
244 Central Coal & Coke Co. 11 32 31 24
195 Central Coal & Coke Co. 15 11 31 24
259 Central Coal & Coke Co. 16 12 32 23
79 Central Coal & Coke Co. 17 28 29. 25
219 Central Coal & Coke Co. 18 22 31 24
148 Central Coal & Coke Co. 30 15 30 25
120 Central Coal & Coke Co. 31 2 30 25
122 Central Coal & Coke Co. 37 3 30 25
73 Central Coal & Coke Co. 38 23 29 25
216 Central Coal & Coke Co. 39 20 31 24
211 Central Goal & Coke Co. 41 16 31 24
272 Central Coal & Coke Co. 42 24 32 23
277 Central Coal & Coke Co. 43 25 32 23
41 Central Coal & Coke Co. 45 23 29 24
40 Central Coal & Coke Co. 48 14 29 24
78 Central Coal & Coke Co. 49 27 29 25
38 Central Coal & Coke Co. 50 12 29 24
37 Central Coal & Coke Co. 51 11 29 24
21 Chambers Coal Co. 1 26 28 25
117 Chapin and Westerlin Coal Co.   36 30 24
203 Chapin and Westerlin Coal Co. 1 14 31 24
253 Cherokee-Crescent Coal Co. 1 6 32 23
249 Cherokee-Crescent Coal Co. 2 2 32 23
214 Cherokee Line Coal Co.   19 31 24
135 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 1 9 30 25
126 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 2 4 30 25
124 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 3 3 30 25
113 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 4 36 30 24
111 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 5 35 30 24
127 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 6 5 30 25
136 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 7 9 30 25
186 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 8 2 31 24
125 Cherokee-Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 9 4 30 25
84 Cherokee- Pittsburg Coal & Mining Co. 12 32 29 25
105 Clemens Coal Co. 3 25 30 24
36 Clemens Coal Co. 4 36 28 25
159 Clemens Coal Co. 6 18 30 25
103 Clemens Coal Co. 7 24 30 24
271 Clemens Coal Co. 9 23 32 23
137 Clemens Coal Co. 10 9 30 25
33 Clemens Coal Co. 11 35 28 25
95 Clemens Coal Co. 15 13 30 24
179 Clemens Coal Co. 17 35 31 23
109 Clemens Coal Co. 18 27 30 24
7 Clemens Coal Co. 19 10 28 25
269 Columbus Coal Co. 8 23 32 23
270 Columbus Coal Co. 8 1/2 23 32 23
17 Cox Creek Coal Co. 1 22 28 25
241 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 2 32 31 24
242 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 3 32 31 24
215 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 7 20 31 24
273 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 8 24 32 23
262 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 10 13 32 23
284 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 10 19 32 24
264 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 10 1/2 13 32 23
206 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 11 15 31 24
202 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 11 1/2 14 31 24
208 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 12 15 31 24
207 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 12 1/2 15 31 24
30 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 14 34 28 25
53 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 15 3 29 25
29 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 16 33 28 25
237 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 18 29 31 24
263 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 19 13 32 2
265 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 20 14 32 23
52 Crowe Coal & Mining Co. 21 3 29 25
288 Cunningham Coal Co.   30 32 24
98 DeGasperi Coal Co. (Active)   22 30 24
61 Dickason Coal Co. 6 10 29 25
128 Dittman & Wachter Coal Co. 1 6 30 25
92 Dittman & Wachter Coal Co. 2 11 30 24
205 Dixon Coal Co.   14 31 24
11 Domestic Fuel Co. 2 12 28 25
6 Domestic Fuel Co. 3 10 28 25
13 Doubleday Coal Co. 1 14 28 25
14 Doubleday Coal Co. 6 14 28 25
88 D. S. and L. Coal Co. 1 36 29 25
123 D. S. and L. Coal Co. 2 3 30 25
16 Faulkner Coal Co. 12 22 28 25
27 Faulkner Coal Co. 14 28 28 25
287 Fleming Coal Co. 3 19 32 24
279 Fleming Coal Co. 4 25 32 23
278 Fleming Coal Co. 5 25 32 23
275 Fleming Coal Co. 6 24 32 23
9 Forest Coal Co. (Slope) 1 12 28 25
166 Four Coal Co.   21 30 25
130 Frontenac Coal Co (Ozark) 6 30 25
81 Gaskill (Gubio) Coal Co. (Active) 1 29 29 25
56 Girard Coal Co. 9 6 29 25
44 Girard Fuel Co. 7 34 29 24
18 Gray & Wolfe Coal Co. 1 23 28 25
189 Hamilton Coal Co.   6 31 24
231 Hamilton Coal Co. 1 28 31 24
232 Hamilton Coal Co. 2 28 31 24
217 Hamilton Coal Co. 3 21 31 24
213 Hamilton Coal Co. 6 18 31 24
46 Hamilton Coal Co. 7 35 29 24
54 Hamilton Coal Co. 8 4 29 25
209 Hamilton & Grant Coal Co. 1 15 31 24
286 Hisle (Ed) Coal Co. 19 32 24
282 Hisle (L. H.) 1 7 32 24
169 House Coal Co. 29 30 25
34 Howe Coal Co. 9 36 28 25
80 Jackson & Walker Coal Co. 11 29 29 25
89 Jackson & Walker Coal Co. 14 1 30 24
93 Jackson & Walker Coal Co. 15 12 30 24
83 Jackson & Walker Coal Co. 16 31 29 25
70 Jackson & Walker Coal Co. 17 20 29 25
133 Jones and Davis Coal Co. 1 7 30 25
146 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 2 15 30 25
260 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 3 12 32 23
139 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 9 10 30 25
145 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 11 15 30 25
230 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 16 27 31 24
140 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 17 11 30 25
222 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 18 22 31 24
104 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 20 25 30 24
142 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 22 11 30 25
221 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 23 22 31 24
201 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 26 12 31 24
184 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 27 1 31 24
116 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 28 36 30 24
223 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 40 22 31 24
224 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 40 1/2 23 31 24
240 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 44 30 31 24
107 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 46 26 30 24
220 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 47 22 31 24
227 Kansas and Texas Coal Co. 49 27 31 24
233 Keith and Perry Coal Co.,
(Bouvard & Dixon)
2 28 31 24
243 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 2 32 31 24
228 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 3 27 31 24
281 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 4 7 32 24
235 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 5 28 31 24
245 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 6 33 31 24
229 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 7 27 31 24
246 Keith and Perry Coal Co. 8 33 31 24
190 Kruger Coal Co. (Active) 1 7 31 24
157 Lafayette Coal Co. 1 17 30 25
132 Lavery Coal Co.   6 30 25
289 Leggett Coal Co.   30 32 24
100 Machine Coal Co. 1 23 30 24
178 Geo. K. Mackie Coal Co. (H) 35 31 23
171 Geo. K. Mackie Coal Co. (J) 13 31 23
162 Malle Coal Co.   18 30 25
176 Mayer Coal Co. 1 33 31 23
255 Mayer Coal Co. 1 9 32 23
90 Mayer Coal Co. 2 Katy 2 30 24
174 Mayer Coal Co. (Slope) 2 32 31 23
239 Mayer Coal Co. 2 30 31 24
45 Mayer Coal Co. 3 34 29 24
172 Mayer Coal Co. 4 25 31 23
267 Mayer Coal Co. 5 17 32 23
170 Mayer Coal Co. 6 36 31 22
180 Mayer Coal Co. 7 36 31 23
175 Mayer Coal Co. (Fidelity) 8 32 31 23
173 Mayer Coal Co. 9 28 31 23
177 Mayer Coal Co. 11 33 31 23
32 McCormick Coal Co. 4 35 28 25
94 McGrath Coal Co. (Active)   13 30 24
198 McGrath Coal Co. 1 12 31 24
181 McGrath Coal Co. 2 1 31 24
204 Mertz & Westerlin Coal Co. 1 14 31 24
35 Miller Coal Co. 1 36 28 25
251 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. 6 5 32 23
163 Missouri-Kansas- Texas Railroad Co. 6 1/2 18 30 25
257 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. 7 9 32 23
254 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. 8 8 32 23
252 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. 11 8 32 23
161 Missouri-Kansas- Texas Railroad Co. 13 18 30 25
250 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. 15 4 32 23
256 Missouri-Kansas- Texas Railroad Co. 16 9 32 23
266 Missouri-Kansas- Texas Railroad Co. 18 17 32 23
160 Missouri-Kansas- Texas Railroad Co. 28 18 30 25
164 Mohawk Coal Co.   18 30 25
112 Moore Brothers Coal Co. 1 36 30 24
115 Morgan and Hupperfelt Coal Co.   36 30 24
226 Moslams and Halstead   27 31 24
19 Mulberry-Cherokee Coal Co. 1 25 28 25
106 Nevius Coal Co. 1 26 30 24
194 Nevius Coal Co. 4 11 31 24
102 Nevius Coal Co. 5 24 30 24
47 Nevius Coal Co. 6 35 29 24
108 Nevius Coal Co. 7 26 30 24
285 Newcastle Coal Co.   19 32 24
91 Newlands & Heinie Coal Co. 1 11 30 24
1 Patton Coal Co. 5 25 28 24
158 Pittsburg Coal Co.   18 30 25
129 Pittsburg Coal Co. 1 6 30 25
238 Pittsburg Coal Co. 4 30 31 24
197 Pittsburg Coal & Coke Co. 1 12 31 24
199 Pittsburg Coal & Coke Co. 2 12 31 24
119 Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. 4 2 30 25
118 Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. 5 1 30 25
143 Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. 7 11 30 25
144 Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. 9 11 30 25
67 Pittsburg-Northwestern Coal Co. 8 16 29 25
4 Poll Coal Co.   1 28 25
268 Quality Coal Co. 1 21 32 23
3 Quality (Sheridan) Coal Co. (Active) 21 36 28 24
165 Ratcliff Coal Co.   19 30 25
22 Rich Hill Coal Co. 1 26 28 25
168 Robson Brothers Coal Co.   29 30 25
74 Sheridan Coal Co. 1 23 29 25
65 Sheridan Coal Co. 2 13 29 25
62 Sheridan Coal Co. 3 11 29 25
25 Sheridan Coal Co. 4 27 28 25
63 Sheridan Coal Co. 5 12 29 25
60 Sheridan, Coal Co. 7 9 29 25
66 Sheridan Coal Co. 8 14 29 25
51 Sheridan Coal Co. 10 2 29 25
15 Sheridan Coal Co. 11 15 28 25
2 Sheridan Coal Co. 12 25 28 24
26 Sheridan Coal Co. 15 27 28 25
5 Sheridan Coal Co. 16 9 28 25
28 Sheridan Coal Co. 18 31 28 25
20 Sheridan Coal Co. 19 25 28 25
97 Simone Coal Co. (Active)   14 30 24
141 Simone Coal Co. 2 11 30 25
50 Spencer-Newlands Coal Co. 7 1 29 25
49 Spencer-New lands Coal Co. 9 1 29 25
121 Standard Coal Co.   3 30 25
134 Starr Coal Co. 1 7 30 25
24 T. R. & G. Coal Co. 2 27 28 25
10 Umbria Coal Co. 2 12 28 25
12 Umbria Coal Co. 5 13 28 25
274 Union Coal Co. (Slope)   24 32 23
48 Victor Fuel Co. 1 36 29 24
200 Victory Coal Co. 26 12 31 24
185 Wear Coal Co. 2 1 31 24
156 Wear Coal Co. 5 5 30 25
43 Wear Coal Co. 17 25 29 24
138 Wear Coal Co. 7 10 30 25
183 Wear Coal Co. 9 1 31 24
101 Wear Coal Co. 11 24 30 24
99 Wear Coal Co. 12 23 30 24
155 Wear Coal Co. 12 1/2 15 30 25
193 Wear Coal Co. 16 11 31 24
42 Wear Coal Co. 19 24 29 24
96 Wear Coal Co. 20 14 30 24
39 Wear Coal Co. 21 13 29 24
191 Western Coal & Mining Co. 2 9 31 24
187 Western Coal & Mining Co. 3 3 31 24
75 Western Coal & Mining Co. 4 25 29 25
87 Western Coal & Mining Co. 5 35 29 25
76 Western Coal & Mining Co. 6 26 29 25
192 Western Coal & Mining Co. 7 10 31 24
212 Western Coal & Mining Co. 10 17 31 24
86 Western Coal & Mining Co. 11 34 29 25
258 Western Coal & Mining Co. 12 10 32 23
77 Western Coal & Mining Co. 13 26 29 .25
188 Western Coal & Mining Co. 14 4 31 24
58 Western Coal & Mining Co. 15 8 29 25
69 Western Coal & Mining Co. 16 18 29 25
68 Western Coal & Mining Co. 18 17 29 25
59 Western Coal & Mining Co. 19 9 29 25
57 Western Coal & Mining Co. 20 7 29 25
248 Western Coal & Mining Co. 21 1 32 23
55 Western Coal & Mining Co. 22 5 29 25
71 Western Coal & Mining Co. 24 22 29 25
110 Wilbert and Schreeb Coal Co. 3 33 30 24
131 Wilson Labelle Coal Co. 7 6 30 25
210 Weir Junction Coal Co. 1 16 31 24
283 (Wildcat)   7 32 24
218 Young Coal Co. 1 21 31 24

Kansas Geological Survey, Mined Areas of the Weir-Pittsburg Coal Bed
Placed on web Jan. 11, 2017; originally published Oct. 25, 1944.
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